mallis

Students Prepare for π Day Contest

Robert Mallis prepares for the contest by practicing in Inman. Photo: Bennett Boushka

Laura Romig studies the digits of pi in the lower library. Photo: Bennett Boushka

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you remember when your lower school teachers used to bring in pies to celebrate Pi Day? On March 14, the Pace community celebrates Pi Day in honor of the number π≈3.14.

Pi Day was founded in 1988 by physicist Larry Shaw. He selected March 14 because the numerical date (3.14) represents the first three digits of pi, and it also happens to be the birthdate of Albert Einstein, one of the greatest mathematicians to live.

But why is π so important? π is a non repeating infinite decimal and is crucial because of what it represents in relation to a circle. It’s the constant ratio of a circle’s circumference to its diameter. Pi is also essential to engineering, making modern construction possible.

In honor of Pi Day there will be a competition between two of Pace’s brightest minds to see who can repeat the most digits of π, and the winner will get a pie.

One contestant is sophomore Laura Romig, known by the Class of 2021 as one of the best students in the grade, currently taking a junior honors math class, Analysis Honors. In fifth grade when the lower school had a similar competition she rattled off so many digits the teachers had to stop her for time’s sake. Romig will be tough to beat in this competition.

The second contestant is legendary freshman Robert Mallis. As a freshman, Mallis is in the sophomore honors math class, Algebra II Honors. Mallis also joins many high schoolers on the math team at Pace and is a fierce competitor at the JV level. With two strong contestants, the competition should be heated.

Watch the competition on March 14 at https://youtu.be/XTt7pAgydyM

Update: Sophomore Dylan Kaminski stood in for Laura Romig in the videotaped contest, as Romig was unavailable. 


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